Author: VWheelock

33. Type 2 Diabetes(T2D) and Low Carbohydrate Diet…Case Studies

In my previous post I referred to research which indicated that T2D can be overcome by switching to a diet with a relatively low content of carbohydrate. In this post I will present a few case studies based on the personal experience of individuals. The first is from Dr John Briffa’s blog(1). It is information from a 56-year old type 2 diabetic who was first diagnosed when he was 42. Despite following the diet he had been recommended, which was essentially low fat and high carbohydrate, his condition had not improved and he steadily gained weight. Recently he had read a book entitled “Primal Mind” by Nora T Gedgaudas, which encouraged him to reduce most of the foods containing grain and to consume animal fats, which he had been avoiding. Here is an extract from the email he sent to Dr Briffa: “I had my 6 monthly diabetes check-up last Wednesday. The diabetes consultant was really happy with all of my figures on cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, weight (I’ve lost another 4 kg since February without really trying), kidney and liver function are excellent – in fact he was really impressed and asked me what I was doing to get these improvements. Simple, I said, I’ve stopped eating wheat in all its forms and grains in general, I avoid rice and all potato products. I eat animal fat and...

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32. Coping with Type 2 Diabetes (T2D)

T2D is one of the modern-day major public health issues. If there are persistent excessive levels of sugar in the blood (glucose) eventually the pancreas becomes exhausted and therefore cannot produce sufficient insulin to prevent the sugar increasing to toxic levels. There is now reliable evidence to demonstrate that those who develop T2D are at increased risk of a range of other diseases/conditions including obesity, hypertension, heart disease, blindness and Alzheimer’s Disease(AD). When T2D is diagnosed it is common practice for drugs to be prescribed, with the object of controlling the sugar levels in the blood. These may well include insulin. Because diabetics are at an increased risk of developing heart disease they are likely to be advised to reduce their consumption of fat, especially saturated fat and to increase the intake of the complex carbohydrates (eg. bread, potatoes, rice and pasta). Prior to all the concern about fat, it was the accepted practice to recommend that diabetics should reduce their intake of carbohydrates. Therefore it is highly relevant that there have been a number of research projects which have been based on this approach. In Sweden, 16 patients who had T2D and a BMI >30 were placed on a diet with low carbohydrate (LCD)which had 20%E as carbohydrate and compared with a similar control group of 15, which had a diet containing 60%E as carbohydrate. Of the LCD...

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31. Does Weight Loss by Calorie Reduction Improve Health?

If losing weight is to be justified then there should be convincing evidence that there will be definite benefits to health for those who actually succeed in reducing their body weight. In an investigation in which 2453 men and 2739 women aged 45 to 74 were monitored initially in the period 1971-1975 and followed up until 1987, it was found that there was a strong association between weight loss and the risk of death from cardiovascular disease among both men and women with BMI in the range 26-29….the overweight category. For men this risk had increased by a factor of 2 and for women it had increased by a factor of well over 3 compared with those who did not lose weight. Similar results were obtained if the analysis was restricted to non-smokers (1). In the Honolulu Heart Study, 6537 Japanese-American men aged 45 to 68 in 1965 and living in Hawaii, were monitored from 1973 to 1988 during which time there were 1217 deaths. The results are shown in Table 1. It is quite clear that there has been a notable increase in the death rate of those who lost weight. By contrast, those who gained up to 4.5kg had a reduced death rate while those who gained more than that did not experience any increase in mortality rate when compared with those whose weight did not vary(2)....

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30. Does Calorie Reduction Result in Long Term Loss of Body Weight?

At any given time there are large numbers of people who are attempting to lose weight. For example a survey conducted in Denmark found that 25% of people classified as underweight were slimming (1). The results for all BMI categories are in Table 1  TABLE 1. PROPORTION SLIMMING IN THE DIFFERENT BMI CATEGORIES BASED ON SURVEY CONDUCTED IN DENMARK BMI category % attempting to lose weight Underweight 25 Normal weight 38 Overweight 54 Obese 77   A survey of 16,486 university students in 21 European countries found that only 8% were overweight and that less than 1% was obese. Nevertheless many of them perceived themselves to be overweight. Consequently 44% of women and 175 of men were trying to lose weight. It was also observed that 14% of women and 35% of men were dieting (2). In the USA, 118,265 men and women located all over the country participated in a telephone survey T he results showed that 29% of men and 44% of women were trying to lose weight. This included 28.7% of women and 8.6% of men with a BMI that was normal. For those who were overweight as determined by BMI the values were 59.6% for women and 35.7% for men. In fact only 1/3 of the men trying to lose weight were classed as obese. For women only ¼ were obese (3). According to information...

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29. Statins and Diabetes

A major study has reported that women who use statins have a much higher risk of developing diabetes mellitus(DM) when compared women who do not. This is one the results obtained in the Women’s Health Initiative(WHI) which is being conducted in the USA(1). The WHI recruited 161,808 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 years at 40clinical centres across the USA between 1993 and 1998. This study is based on an analysis of data available up to 2005 from 153,840 participants. Of these 10,834 were statin users. The average age of all those involved was just over 63 years. Those who used statins had an incidence of DM which was 71% higher than those who did not. The increased risk of DM was observed for all types of statin. There was no difference between high- and low-potency statins. One particularly interesting feature of the results was the relatively high risk of developing DM in those who had a BMI of 25 or less. This BMI is considered to be the ideal but nevertheless statin users had more than double the risk of developing DM as compared with the non-users. TABLE 1 VARIATION IN RELATIVE RISK OF DEVELOPING DIABETES WITH BODY MASS INDEX(BMI) BMI STATIN USER RELATIVE RISK <25.0 YES 2.50 NO 1.00(Reference) 25.0-29.9 YES 1.91 NO 1.00(Reference) >30.0 YES 1.23 NO 1.00(Reference)   It is absolutely crucial to recognise that...

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